Browser Extension: Stylus

The stylus extension is a new addition to my browser (Edge, available for all Chromium browsers). The core idea: it allows for changing stylesheets on websites while you browse without actually changing the server.

This might be because it’s a website you don’t own. Get really annoyed at the new Twitter font (I actually really like it)? Write your own stylesheet so that whenever you’re browsing you see something else.

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Domain Change

This site is now ryanrobinson.technology instead of alliterationapplications.com. I felt that it was more representative of what this site has evolved to become. It is a repository of my technology knowledge and experience. It isn’t just about the rare freelance work that I do under the Alliteration Applications banner. Many of the blog posts came from personal study, personal projects, and (generalized versions of) work done within a full-time job – not from Alliteration Applications at all.

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MySQL Workbench

You know what desktop app made the largest improvement to my workflows when I discovered it? Not Visual Studio Code, as much as my writing sometimes hypes it up as my preferred text editor. There were already good text editors.

No, the desktop tool that made the biggest improvement to my workflows was MySQL Workbench. If you work with databases at all, this will make your life so much easier than navigating those databases in a command line.

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Microsoft Teams: Phone Numbers

I personally have not used Microsoft Teams as a phone system. My employers have stuck completely with Internet-based communications, mostly to others in the same organization. But if you want to integrate your organization’s phone system into Teams and have your phone calls ring through in Teams, that’s absolutely possible.

Here’s an introduction on some of the things to consider:

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Microsoft Teams: Information Barriers

What if you need to partition your organization so that some members of your tenant cannot communicate with others in Teams? For example, maybe you have interns who you do want to have Teams access but not to any sensitive information.

Information barriers are the solution you need. You can block interaction across the barriers so that the interns cannot see any content from anybody else or vice versa.

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Microsoft Teams: Lifecycle

If you’ve been paying attention to Microsoft 365 products in the last 5 years or so, you’ve likely noticed that things have moved toward a much flatter architecture where users have more freedom to set up their own Teams / SharePoint sites, etc. In many ways this is great, but it does carry some risks of sprawl caused by users casually creating data structures and then forgetting about them.

Fortunately, Microsoft does offer some mechanisms in the Teams lifecycle to help with this.

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Microsoft Teams: Network Tests

If you’re going to deploy Microsoft Teams in your business network, you’ll need to confirm first that your network can handle it. That means fast enough bandwidth speeds to handle everything you want all of your employees to be able to do, as well as having all the ports open for the necessary traffic to get through. If you’re going to need hundreds of users on the same network sharing their screens alongside their video and audio in meetings of 50 people, that will eat up a lot of network resources.

Microsoft has offered a few tools to help with this preparation.

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